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Updated: 3 min 42 sec ago

Anythink Libraries' Shakespeare Society: Pizza and a Play

6 hours 31 min ago
In the first of a new series of posts that feature librarians' successful ideas and creative solutions, Katharine Phenix from Anythink Libraries in Colorado tells us about "Shakespeare Society: Pizza and a Play," a popular program that has been running strong for six years! Hello Katharine, please tell us about this program! This program started out as readers' theater for adults, and we read a few plays that were copyright free, but after we read our first work by Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, we never looked back. We meet every other month (except June, July and December) on the first and second Tuesdays from 6 to 8 pm. Each play takes exactly two sessions, with the first half hour being for pizza. Attendees have included y...
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Do readers have an obligation to history to read "difficult" books?

Mon, 04/16/2018 - 20:47
I was recently participating in BookBrowse's online book discussion for Vaddey Ratner's excellent novel, Music of the Ghosts, in which the main characters are survivors of the Khmer Rouge. Needless to say, since it discusses the horrors Cambodian citizens endured during the genocide, it contains some pretty intense passages, and one of my fellow posters mentioned finding the subject matter "difficult" and therefore hard to read about. This comment prompted an offline discussion with others regarding books that cover topics that we generally don't want to dwell on, specifically humanity's ability to be unimaginably cruel to others or indifferent to their suffering.  The question arose: As readers, do we have an obligation to history... [More]
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Five Female-Focused Historical Novels for Book Clubs

Mon, 04/09/2018 - 16:30
Women are at the heart of each of these historical novels, and so are the deep challenges of holding family together and pursuing personal dreams all at the same time. The Women in the Castle and Manhattan Beach both explore the effects of war on women and their families, while Love and other Consolation Prizes and Rebellion take readers across time and place to shine a light on the hidden ways we are all connected. Finally See What I Have Done offers an intimate glimpse into one family's complicated dynamics - sometimes what we think we see isn't always what is true, and sometimes we are not as connected as we appear to be. Each of these books are, or soon will be, available in paperback and are already available in e-b... [More]
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Reading Makes You Healthy Infographic

Wed, 03/28/2018 - 16:14
You're about to curl up with that book you selected from BookBrowse's Editor's Choice, and you have tea brewing in the kitchen. It's time to dive right into another world.

Did you know that when you reemerge, you come back healthier, more empathic, and sharper? Reading also helps you live longer too. A study has shown that those who read for more than 3.5 hours per week are 23% less likely to die than those who do not read books.
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Four Exceptional Female Comic Book Writers

Thu, 03/22/2018 - 00:04
Leia Birch, the central character in Joshilyn Jackson's The Almost Sisters, is the writer of a comic books series published by DC Comics. While the characters and the comic are both fictional, in real-life, as is in the book, female writers are in the minority. The comic book world is chock full of men - they are both characters in the pages and the writers and illustrators creating those pages - but women have made significant contributions to the genre. From the early 20th century, when comics were just entering the newspaper scene and Nell Brinkley became famous for her well-loved illustrations to Becky Cloonan, who was the first woman to draw Batman for DC Comics in 2012, women have written and drawn comics for newspapers, mainstream pu... [More]
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Six Spectacular Books Set in East Africa for Book Clubs

Mon, 03/12/2018 - 11:30
East Africa is home to many countries with many different cultures, people, landscapes, traditions -- and stories. It would be a challenge for half a dozen books to give a balanced representation of a single country, let alone the 14 countries of continental Eastern Africa*, but we hope that these six books set in Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda and Zimbabwe (listed in approximate geographical order, north to south) will give you and your book club a small taste of the region and, perhaps, spark a thirst to learn more.
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Beyond the Book: Ireland

Mon, 02/26/2018 - 17:43

At BookBrowse we seek to help readers deepen their understanding of themselves and the world around them. We go beyond the book, providing original articles that look at cultural, historical or contextual aspects of each of our featured titles.

With this in mind, and with Saint Patrick's Day approaching, here we highlight some recent books that explore Ireland and Irish culture, and share each book's corresponding "Beyond the Book" article - for free!
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Read, Watch & Discuss! Five great book club books that are now movies

Sun, 02/11/2018 - 20:09
Of course, we think any season is the right season to read, but winter can be a perfect time to read and watch! What better way to keep busy in these cold, dark months than reading with your book club, watching the movie version and then discussing both? It's always fun to watch characters you know and love come to life on the screen, and book club discussions can be broadened to explore comparisons between the book and movie. If you love books that delve into relationships, Our Souls at Night, and Call Me by Your Name are great choices. If you're interested in broader, social issue focused novels, we recommend Mudbound, Thank You for Your Service and The Colour Bar: The True Story of a Love That Shook an Empire (movie title: ... [More]
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When Fantasy is More Real Than Nonfiction

Tue, 02/06/2018 - 00:01
Ask me with a gun to my head if I believe in them, all the gods and myths that I write about, and I'd have to say no. Not literally. Not in the daylight, nor in well-lit places, with people about. But I believe in the stories we can tell with them. I believe in the reflections that they show us when they are told. And forget it or ignore it at your peril, it remains true: these stories have power. - Neil Gaiman, from Reflections on Myth It is through fantasy that we have always sought to make sense of the world, not through reason…It is through the fictive projections of our imaginations based on personal experience that we have sought to grasp, explain, alter, and comment on reality. This is again why such staples as the... [More]
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A Few Outstanding Women War Correspondents

Tue, 01/23/2018 - 14:55
Souad Mekhennet is one of many women journalists who have entered dangerous situations to try to inform the world about conditions in a war zone. A few of the most influential and best-known, now deceased, are listed below. [More]
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Six Debut Novels for Book Clubs in 2018

Mon, 01/15/2018 - 20:34
As we settle into 2018, here are six of the best debut novels to read and discuss during the year. If you love books about place and community, Golden Hill, The Big Dry and If the Creek Don't Rise all transport readers to the streets of small towns and big cities and into the hearts of the people who struggle to make their lives there. Secrets are held – and readers' attentions are held too! – in both The Second Mrs. Hockaday and The Mothers. And, finally, readers can't help but root for quirky, clever teenager Ginny Moon even as she resists the loving family that finally wants to bring her home. All of these debuts are sure to spark emotion and conversation and are great bets for your book club! Read on for information on each... [More]
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